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The 4 Best Sights for Glock 22 – Night Sight Reviews 2020 Photo by Jeff Eaton / CC BY The Glock 22 . 40 pistol is one of the most popular Glock models. Issued by dozens of police departments from municipalities, to state to federal, the Glock 22 serves and has for decades.

The 4 Best Sights for Glock 22 – Night Sight Reviews 2020 Photo by Jeff Eaton / CC BY The Glock 22 .40 pistol is one of the most popular Glock models. Issued by dozens of police departments from municipalities, to state to federal, the Glock 22 serves and has for decades. However, it does have a weakness, and it’s the standard Glock has “target” sights that are rather pitiful.  See, the only upgrade a Glock really needs is a solid set of sights. Whatever sights you choose, make sure they’re metal and extremely durable. The sights should also be easy to see, and this can be tailored for both night and day shooters. The sights should be precise and allow a shooter to engage their target accurately, and they should also be easy to install and should be fixed (fixed sights are tougher and more dependable on a firearm made for combat). The Glock 22 is an excellent weapon, and its sights should be as dependable as the weapon. Here are the 4 best sights for Glock 22 on the market, which an emphasis on sights that can be  seen at night or in low light. MeproLight Tru-Dot Sights Meprolight Glock Tru-Dot Night Sight for 9mm, .357 Sig, .40 S&W . 45 GAP. Fixed Set. Green Rear Sight with Green Front Sight Price: $70.30 Price as of 08/14/2020 01:55 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. The Meprolight Tru-Dot sights are an industry favorite for police-issued weapons. Combining both an affordable price and excellent performance, the sights have also become very popular with the general public.  The MeproLight Tru-Dots are night sights that glow in all forms of low light. These sights do not require the user to charge them with external light either. The MeproLight sights are capable of lasting up to 15 years of service before beginning to lose their glow. The MeproLight Tru-Dot sights are available for the Glock 22, but can also fit multiple models. The sights glow nice and bright at night, and they stand out well against most backgrounds. The sight glow a bright neon green, these glowing sights are very easy to see in the dark and make low light firing possible and accurate. During the day, the sights are of course much dimmer but are still capable enough to use with accuracy and precision. The MeproLight Tru-Dot sights are easy to install and do not require a gunsmith for most shooters. Of course, some shooters may prefer the expertise of a smith. The sights are made of a tough and durable metal that is virtually indestructible in normal situations. They are a standard set of sights with three glowing dots. This is an excellent set of sights for someone looking for an affordable, yet reliable option.  These are among the best night sites for Glock 22 period. MEPROLIGHT TRU DOT NIGHT SIGHTS FOR GLOCK - REVIEW Watch this video on YouTube

Survival Gear Review: goTenna Off-Grid Device

Survival Gear Review: goTenna Off-Grid Device

Well, I guess Facebook is good for something.  I was having one of those mindless moments where scrolling through the feed seemed like a better thing to do than, you know, reading a book, or working out, or bettering myself in some way.  It was the same stuff over and over, but then a promotion for a product caught my eye.  It was called goTenna Off Grid Device , and it hailed as being a radio-based, off-the-grid communications tool that lets you send texts and share location data. I bit the lure – hook, line, and sinker.  I checked out the goTenna Facebook page, then migrated to their website. The goTenna looked like a promising new-fangled device, and soon I had a pair of them winging my way for a review. Quick Navigation Meet The goTenna Making The goTenna Work For You Range to Target? Conclusions Meet The goTenna The goTenna , put simply, is a communications device that links to your smartphone via Blutooth-LE (Low Energy).  Using the goTenna app (which you have to download – don’t worry, it’s free), you pair a goTenna with your Android or IOS based device, and you instantaneously have the ability to chat via text message with any other active goTenna within range.  The goTenna also allows you to send those other goTenna users your location, which is represented on a map – a map which you must download ahead of time (also for free via the goTenna app). These are the two basic functions of the device, and it accomplishes these functions completely independent of a wireless network or cell service, using long-range (151-154 MHz) radio waves to communicate with other GoTenna users.  However, the goTenna doesn’t allow voice or video calling, or data transfer.  It sticks to a simple formula for basic communication, and it works.  Let’s dig deeper. Also Read Drew’s Review: Rothco CCW Jacket The goTenna is a small (5.8 inches long, 1 inch wide, ½ inch thick with the antenna collapsed) plastic and aluminum device with a built-in nylon strap that sports a loop and a snap button for securing a goTenna to, well, anything that will fit inside the loop. An antenna pulls out from the top, activating the goTenna and telling it to start communicating with its paired smartphone via Bluetooth. Pushing the antenna back into the goTenna deactivates the device with a satisfying “click”. It has an indicator light on the outside of the casing, which is used via different flashing patterns to communicate if the goTenna has paired, if it’s searching, once a message has been received, etc. Underneath a small dust proof door, there’s the expected micro-USB port on the bottom of the goTenna to hook the device, via included charging cables, to a charger. A tiny red LED next to the USB port shows the charging status. The goTenna’s lithium-polymer battery is sealed, meaning that it cannot be removed or replaced, and will eventually show declining battery life like any other battery-powered device…though this will take years of constant use. BaoFeng BF-F8HP (UV-5R 3rd Gen) 8-Watt Dual Band Two-Way Radio (136-174MHz... Upgrades from our Previous Generation UV-5R: Twice the Output Power (8 watts up from 4 watts... High / Med / Low Power Settings (8W, 4W, 1W); Frequency Range: 65-108 MHz(Only commercial FM radio... See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 14:08 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API The goTenna is water-resistant and “weatherproof”, meaning it can be latched on your pack during a rainstorm. However, if it goes swimming with you, don’t expect it to work afterwards. It is dust-tight as well. The goTenna has been engineered to be very durable – I’ve dropped mine onto my tile floor multiple times from waist height with zero ill effects. In short, it’s meant to be useful to many types of people – whether you’re a hunter or fisherman communicating with buddies in your party, mountain climbers who might take a tumble down a hill, or anyone else who might be in adverse conditions that require off-grid communications. In my experience, ice and snow have built up on the goTenna while packing it in the woods in a Maine winter and during a February ice fishing trip – it shrugged off the cold and elements with aplomb.  I have every confidence it will withstand most inclement conditions as long as it isn’t submerged. Making The goTenna Work For You As stated, the goTenna interfaces with your smartphone (IOS or Android) via Bluetooth LE.  I should say this now: the gotenna will not work with your old Nokia flip-phone; a caveat to the system is that it requires a relatively modern smartphone.  goTenna’s website says that the device will work with Apple iPods and iPads and other tablets; however, I’m not sure how the GPS location -finding function will work with these devices if there is no GPS built-in to the device. Anyhow, your first step: order your goTenna. These can be purchased online via the goTenna Website. They get ordered in pairs or “family” packs of four goTennas. As of right now, the pairs go for $199.00 with free shipping, and the family pack saves you a few bucks per unit at $389 – also shipped to your door for free. They come in four different strap colors to differentiate between the individual units – purple, orange, green, and blue. Related Article: Survival Radio – What Will Work? Once you have the goTennas in your hot little hands, you need to download the goTenna app via The Google Play store (if you’re running an Android 4.3 or higher-based phone) or via iTunes for iOS 8.4 and up-based Apple products. The app is free and a quick download.  Once you have the app installed on your smartphone and you fire it up, your phone will initiate a simple, easy-to-follow setup that creates an account and links your phone to your selected goTenna; this is about a three-minute process.  Once you have the app set up and your goTenna paired, you have a few options to play with. You’ll first be brought to the main message overview screen.  This shows a list of all the people you’ve sent messages to.  As an option, you can import the contacts on your phone to have their numbers and possible goTenna contacts saved in the app.  You can access the contacts via the menu, which is accessed by the icon in the upper left of the screen.  At the bottom right, you have a round blue button that allows you to write a new message to other goTenna users, via one of three processes: -The Shout Chat: This allows you send out a “shout” message to any other active goTenna users in range. -The Group Chat: A way to communicate with multiple known goTenna users at once, useful for hunting parties, SAR, camp buddies, etc. -1-to-1 Chat: A standard one-on-one goTenna-to-g0Tenna message, very similar to an SMS or text message. There is also an “Emergency” chat option, but when selected, you are directed via text in a bright red box to keep chats in this option dedicated to true emergencies.  It broadcasts an emergency message to anyone with a goTenna who is within range. Also Read: CB Radios For SHTF To send a message to another goTenna user, simply tap the new message icon, choose your goTenna-utilizing recipient, and start typing.  Hit the “send” icon when you’re done. The message will show a little moving icon while the goTennna sends the message.  If the message was sent to the recipient successfully, a little green check mark appears in the corner of your message. If the goTenna was unable to send the message, a small red exclamation mark appears. It will also tell you the time you sent your last message.  You can request the location of other goTenna users, so they can “ping” you or attach their location to their messages.  You can also block them if desired. Another function of the goTenna is the map view; you tap the little map icon at the top of the screen to actuate this task.  Once you download the goTenna app, your device communicates with your phone’s GPS to show your current location to yourself; you can also “ping” other users to show your location on the map, or include location in text messages (this locaton is transferred to the map, not communicated via the message screen.). If you’re heading to an obscure area to fly fish for rainbow trout in northern Colorado, you simply download the Colorado map ahead of time.  This will allow you to utilize the map – which is saved to your phone – to show your location while off the data grid, unlike most other map apps.  The accuracy is very good; I’m not sure of the location accuracy tolerances, but whenever I used the map, the little blue dot showed me exactly where I knew I was. I would imagine the location services are effected by standard GPS impediments: cloud cover, buildings, line of sight to satellites, etc. A nice touch: the battery life remaining on your paired goTenna is available to view easily through the app as well.  Battery life has been excellent: once I got the goTennas, I plugged them in to top off the charge, and actually I haven’t had to charge them yet. If the goTenna is constantly on, battery life is expected to be about 24 hours. If you’re constantly using it to have extensive message exchanges, it can shorten, depending on usage. If a communications schedule is maintained between users, keeping the goTenna off between scheduled message times, you can keep a goTenna with a charge for quite some time – days. I have not seen a loss of battery charge when kept turned off for days on end. These are the basic functions of the goTenna – for now. The website promises updates in the future – and I’ll admit that there is a lot of promise for added functionality for this neat little communications gadget. As of right now, the short list of basic action items the goTenna accomplishes means that the goTenna is very, very simple to use and still pretty effective at what it does. But how effective is it? Range to Target? The next obvious question should be: “Okay, what is the range?” And it’s a valid question.  goTenna says that the range varies depending on terrain – it functions on basic line-of-sight principles.  If you’re in a wooded forest or in an apartment building on the Upper West Side of Manhattan , your range will be limited.  But goTenna boasts that on the rare opportunity you may have broadcasting mountaintop to mountaintop, you might even be able to find a 50-mile range within grasp. Most of us operate somewhere in the middle of these extremes, so I decided to try the goTenna out in a variety of situations to see how it worked.  I loaded the app on my LG G4 phone and went to work. The first opportunity I had to use the goTenna was on an ice fishing trip up in Northern Maine, on the shores of Maine’s largest body of water, Moosehead Lake . We only gave the goTenna a run a couple times, but across clear ice, we were able to send messages across a couple miles of open, clear air across a frozen lake, with a small island between us. Message exchanges were quick and easy, (even considering our advanced state of inebriation – a requirement in Maine ice fishing) so I imagine that we could have stretched the range further if we desired. Next, I coerced a 60-year-old coworker to download the goTenna app on his Samsung Galaxy S4.  We work in a 300,000 square foot manufacturing facility, with concrete walls, steel columns, metal racks filled with aluminum extrusions, large CNC machines running, plus a huge electronic computer server room and 60 or so computers, and 80+ cellphones operating at any given time. I had him stay in his office, which was conveniently located near a corner of the building. I then walked around the entire facility, stopping to message at key points neat equipment, material, or other possible reception intrusions. The goTenna worked flawlessly throughout the entire building even though walls, which impressed me. I honestly didn’t think the goTenna would pass the big concrete building test. Also Read: Prepper Monthly Checklist The next major test I ran was with my teenage son.  I had him load the app on his iPhone 6S , and he plunked the antenna next to him. I then hopped in my pickup and drove around our hilly suburban village home area, pulling into different areas to message him.  I had pretty good success closer to the house, out to a Google Maps-measured 1,567 feet. Then I started to have difficulty getting messages to go through.  I turned airplane mode off (I had engaged it to make sure I wasn’t letting any data through) and texted my son – he wasn’t getting replies back to me, either. I told him to open a window and locate the goTenna outside. He did so, and we kept going.  He was able to sit on the couch in standard slumped modern teenager fashion with the TV, iPad, and his cellphone on, and have the goTenna 15 feet away outside the house, and keep communicating with me (Bluetooth range is about 20 feet).  The antenna outside of the house made a difference; I was able to send messages again. I continued to drive around, again stopping at points that I could find on Google Earth to measure distances from. I got to 3,499 feet from the house with success – probably owing to the slight elevation increases I was driving up – before the village houses and surrounding woodlands starting taking their toll.  I’d pull over and hold the antenna up in the air, move my location slightly, and keep trying – and I eventually got a message to go through at 5,945 feet (over a mile) once – but that was about the maximum I could get through the woods.  Elevation and clear line of sight helps. Related: Radio Scanners For SHTF I haven’t had the chance to go long, long distance over clear, open ranges, or in large urban areas as of yet.  But based on my tests so far, goTenna’s predictions on their website under “how it works” have been pretty close to spot-on.  I plan on using the goTenna to communicate between bird hunting parties this fall up in Northern Maine, where communications and coordinations have been spotty due to an almost complete lack of cell reception; the goTenna should be just the ticket. The goTenna IS encrypted for privacy, utilizing a 384-bit elliptic curve point-to-point encryption process.  I’m not going to go into the tech specs of the goTenna, because I’ll admit I don’t know much about that stuff.  However, if you love geeking out over such things, I would heartily recommend going to the goTenna website and reading their “FAQ” section for tech specs as well as a LOT of other information on the goTenna that ranges from the best locations to keep your antenna, to Bluetooth range from your phone to the goTenna, firmware updates, methods of increasing battery life, what effects signal range, and more. I tested the goTenna with a wide range of phones, including an iPhone 4S , Motorola DROID RAZR M, Samsung Galaxy S4, iPhone 6, iPhone 6S, and my LG G4.  As long as your smartphone has Bluetooth and meets minimum operating system requirements of Android 4.3 (Jelly Bean) or higher, or Apple iOS 8.4 or higher, you should be good to go.  The app ran flawlessly in all the devices.  The app interface was clean, simple, intuitive, and easy to use…my 60-year-old technologically befuddled coworker was able to use the app with zero coaching…so that’s saying something. If you have a smartphone and can use it to text, you can use a goTenna. Conclusions The goTenna is definitely a viable off-the-grid communications device .  Range is limited, but the range is a pretty useful one, depending on your location and terrain.  Once the app is loaded, the phone does not require a data or cellular connection to function; it is completely independent.  You could lock a pair of these in a Faraday cage with a properly-sized solar panel to charge the units, along with a couple ready-to-go smartphones with the app loaded on them (perhaps the old phones you don’t use anymore after an upgrade?), and you could have basic communications even after an EMP, or complete power grid outage.  The goTenna is light, small, portable, rechargeable, weather resistant, silent, and tough – can you say the same for your battery-dependent walkie-talkies? It’s something to consider when you’re looking at a solution for off-the-grid communications – even if you have a large group of people in your crew.  You can send text and GPS location to one or multiple people at a time, even when you don’t have service.  Take a long, hard look at the goTenna to accentuate your communications plans – it actually works, and works very well within its intended envelope. For More Information Visit www.gotenna.com BaoFeng BF-F8HP (UV-5R 3rd Gen) 8- "Watt Dual Band" Two-Way Radio (136-174MHz... Upgrades from our Previous Generation UV-5R: Twice the Output Power (8 watts up from 4 watts... High / Med / "Low Power Settings" (8W, 4W, 1W); Frequency Range: 65-108 MHz(Only commercial FM radio... See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 14:08 / Affiliate links / Images from "Amazon Product Advertising" API All photos by Drew Other interesting articles: Survival Gear Review: Surefire FirePak Going Off Grid – Part III "Survival Gear Review" : SunJack Solar Charger Survival Gear Review: Personal Solar Light (PSL)

Best Survival Rifle: Top 5 Picks for 2020

Best Survival Rifle: Top 5 Picks for 2020

A good survival rifle provides a means for hunting and food gathering and self-defense. A great survival rifle is also affordable, lightweight, sufficiently accurate, easy to store and maintain, and comes chambered in an easy-to-find caliber. Thanks to new carbines and configurations, this category has grown from the likes of the ole’ AR-7 Takedown to a plethora of different cartridges and rifles. We’re comparing the top survival rifles of 2020, covering traditional breakdown rimfires, pistol-caliber carbines, the legendary 10/22, the AR, and more. Quick Navigation The Best Survival Rifle of 2020 1. Best 22 Survival Rifle – Ruger 10/22 TakeDown Review 2. Henry AR-7 Review 3. Chiappa Little Badger Review 4. Savage Model 42 TakeDown Review 5. KelTec SUB2000 Review 6. KelTec SU16 Review 7. Best All Around Survival Rifle – The Good Ole’ AR-15 Review "The Best Survival" Rifle of 2020 1. Best 22 Survival Rifle – Ruger 10/22 TakeDown Review In a nutshell: Ruger took the legendary 10/22 and made it a proper toolless break-down rifle. It should be little surprise this comes as our first entrant: The Ruger 10/22 platform has long been favored by woodsman and survivalists for its legendary reliability, shoot-the-wings-off-a-fly accuracy, and its low price. The TakeDown configuration of the 10/22 provides greater portability, allowing the rifle to be – as the name obviously implies – broken down into two portable halves. The barrel and front stock separate from the receiver, allowing the rifle to be stowed more easily in a carry bag or container. Broken in two parts, the business end measures 18.5” from chamber to muzzle, and the receiver and buttstock end measures the same for a total length of 37”. No tools are required to separate or reassemble the rifle, and the TD configuration doesn’t depart from Ruger’s parent design in any other way. That means you still get to use the original rotary mag or 25-round magazine, and the TD can still use the same irons, optics, and accessories . Ruger also managed to keep the TD lightweight – it graces the scales at 4.7 pounds – by keeping the buttstock hollow and using plenty of polymer. You’ll pay around $80 to $100 over the standard wood-stock Ruger for the TD configuration (which often retails in the $250 price range) but Ruger is kind enough to throw in a ballistic nylon carry bag for storing your rifle and accessories or ammo. Few other survival rifles can provide such a compact break-apart profile without sacrificing some measure of performance or function. For that alone, the 10/22 TakeDown is arguably one of the top choices on the market. We love it so much we wrote a full review and got a closer look . We also compared the S&W 15-22 vs Ruger 10/22 as well. 2. Henry AR-7 Review In a nutshell: The AR-7 is one of the most compact .22-cal. survival rifles ever made (and it floats!). If you want a survival rifle that measures less than a foot-and-a-half when stowed, affords great accuracy out to 50 yards or more, and functions with a proper stick magazine, the Henry AR-7 is tough to beat. Originally fielded by U.S. Air Force pilots, the rifle now known officially as the U.S. Survival .22 is considered by many to be the original survival rifle. Developed by ArmaLite in the late 50s, the AR-7 is a true “emergency shooter” before anything else: It sports no front stock or any other off-hand assist, it comes with a single thumb safety, the receiver is canted off-center to fit inside the buttstock, and there are no chamber-integrated feed ramps – the magazine itself provides the ramp. The tradeoff is an incredibly lightweight rifle that weighs just 3.5 pounds loaded and measures only 16.5” when stowed inside its water-buoyant buttstock. Fully assembled, the Henry is still more compact than Ruger’s finest, measuring 35” with a 16” barrel. Cramming the whole gun into the stock means sacrificing some ammo. The OEM mags sport an 8-round capacity, though plenty of aftermarket mags are available on the cheap. We found there is some extra space inside the stock for a few extra rounds or a fire starter. The Henry isn’t just made for emergencies by configuration. It sports a rugged Teflon coating for the receiver, and the barrel is coated, too. The ABS plastic stock is impact-resistant and features a rubber O-ring seal in the chance it winds up in the wet. Adjustable sights with a bright orange blade make target acquisition easy in low light and the whole kit comes in at around $250. We dove into the AR-7 in greater detail and tested it out in a review . 3. "Chiappa Little Badger" Review In a nutshell: The Little Badger is the simplest, lightest, and most affordable survival rifle, maybe ever. The Henry AR-7 wasn’t the only survival rifle to be fielded by the U.S. Military. A competing design dubbed the M6 Survival Weapon offered a single-shot, break-action rifle/shotgun combination that was even simpler. It had its flaws ( we reviewed the M6 here ) and was discontinued. Chiappa, the Italian arms maker, saw potential and took inspiration from the M6, improved on its roots and ran with it. Intro the Little Badger.  This pencil-thin survival rifle is so small and simple, it’s practically impossible to break it. Well, except for the break-top action. It’s a single-shot rifle with no magazine like the M6 – and no complicated internals – to speak of. It ditches any fixtures, pins and other baubles and bits to combine the break-action with the folding feature. Just pop it open and tuck the barrel underneath the stock, and it’s ready for a backpack or storage, forming a 17” x 8” triangle. Some owners have reported swapping out the main bolt for a pull-tab hitch pin, allowing one to disassemble the rifle into two halves like the Ruger TakeDown. The wireframe buttstock and minuscule receiver keep things as light as possible (the whole rifle weighs just 2.9 pounds loaded). The surprisingly well-considered adjustable iron sights mimic that of an A2-block M16, paired with a 16.5” barrel to provide excellent accuracy. A beautifully simple bandolier is built into the end of the stock, allowing one to store up to 12 rounds of ammo. Chambers come available in good ole’ .22 LR, .22 WMR, .17 HMR, and the incredibly quirky 9mm Flobert shotshell. Chiappa recognized the Little Badger may be too simple for some, so they provided plenty of rail estate for adding a pistol grip behind the trigger housing and a small glass optic or red dot up top. The wire frame’s perfect for creative bushcrafters who may want to stow away a few yards’ worth of paracord or a hunting knife with a sheath, too. "The Little Badger" comes in under the $200 price point, making it the most affordable entrant you’ll see on our list. 4. Savage Model 42 TakeDown Review In a nutshell: You like the Badger’s profile but want a rifle/shotgun combo for birds and bigger game. Most ultralight break-down rifles are stuck with small rimfire chambers. That’s no good if you’re hunting small boar, deer, or you’re trying to take some birds. The Savage Model 42 TakeDown is the M6 Survival Weapon in spirit, offering a break-top action with a .410 and .22-LR/.22 Magnum chamber. Obviously, a 20-gauge isn’t ideal for taking a trophy elk or big buck during your regularly scheduled season. But a .410 slug has a great chance of putting the typical deer down inside 100 yards with the right shot placement. The .410 shotshell was also practically made for calling birds no matter where you may find yourself, and feathers are always in abundance where other game may hide. That makes for an easy meal with a single trigger pull. Varmint doesn’t get left out either, again thanks to the .22 sitting atop the smoothbore. For double barrels, the Model 42 weighs 6.1 pounds. That makes it the heaviest of the breakdown rifles. But it compensates with what most reviewers say is amazing accuracy. Both barrels measure 20” while overall length stays relatively compact at 25.5” when folded. Folding is toolless with a button push. The Model 42 manages to stay small and compact like the other entrants on our list, but Savage kept things comfortable: The 42 features a proper synthetic buttstock with rubber recoil pad and ergonomic foregrip with ambidextrous thumb grooves. Factory sights are simple open leafs, but the top of the receiver accommodates a scope or red dot base. Make sure to check out top picks for prism scopes that go well with these rifles. 5. KelTec SUB2000 Review In a nutshell: The SUB2000 is a PCC that’s small like a proper survival rifle with high ammo capacity. Varmint rounds like the .22 family are great if you want to carry a rifle that’s small, simple, and compact, but pistol calibers can afford all the same benefits and provide plenty of extra power. That’s the approach KelTec took with their folding SUB2000 pistol carbine. At just 4.25 pounds it’s still lighter than Ruger’s 10/22 and comes with a 15-round grip magazine like a traditional handgun. Aftermarket mags can pump up total capacity to whopping 40 or 50 rounds. It’s also just as compact (if not more so) than most survival rifles: Locked and loaded it measures just 29.5” and it hunkers down to a respectable 16” when folded in half. Barrel length is 16.1” and the chamber’s available in 9mm or .40 S&W. Blowback operation keeps the rifle reliable, and the quick-burning powder of those pistol cartridges means you’re getting max velocity and excellent accuracy out to 150 yards. KelTec included small features like a spring-loaded collar that ensures the barrel is tight against the receiver when unfolded. Heavy-duty hardware keeps the firing pin and extractor seated and the recoil spring is captured to an operating rod with a buffer much like the high-end JP Silent Springs you’d find on a custom AR. Folding is simple and toolless, too – just pull down on the trigger guard to unlock the receiver from the barrel and swing the barrel up over top the buttstock. A folding rear sight and front open-leaf sight come standard, with some rails on the forward stock to add a light or other accessory. The buttstock is simple but it does adjust. If you’re a Glock owner, you’ll be happy to learn you can pick up the SUB2000 configured for Glock magazines. Or you can stick with KelTec’s OEM mags. The SUB2000 can be had for prices ranging from $360 to $420, depending on color and caliber. 6. KelTec SU16 Review In a nutshell: The SU16 takes the folding rifle and adds power with a 5.56 NATO chamber and mag. The break-down rifle category’s filled with small .22-rimfire chambers, but KelTec once again departed from the norm and introduced the SU16 with a beefier 5.56 NATO coming down the business end. This folding survival shooter also comes packed with some surprising features you’d normally find on a typical high-end tactical rifle: A gas piston-operated AR bolt and extractor with side charging handle, a standard AR-15 mag well for 30 rounds down the tube, a crisp trigger, comfortable polymer handguard that doubles as a fold-out bipod, adjustable irons and a factory rail for glass or red dots. Variants of the SU16 come with even more features: a thicker buttstock capable of holding two additional magazines, a carbine version with a quad rail handguard, an AR-style buffer tube with an adjustable stock, and a ½x28 threaded muzzle for your favorite suppressor. Of course, final price ticks up with every additional bell and whistle. But the base price of around $500-$600 for what amounts to a gas-operated black rifle that folds down to just 26.4” is one helluva deal. Standard barrel length is 18.5” with a 1:7 twist, affording maximal velocity and accuracy. That fast twist rate handles the most common 55-grain and 62-grain loads but favors heavier 77- to 90-grain loads (which is what you should be shooting if you’re trying to take some game, anyway). Total weight for the lightest folding variant –the SU16C – manages to stay at just 4.7 pounds, impressive for any gas piston rifle. In fact, that’s as light as the Ruger TakeDown, and much lighter than the typical AR-15 and AK-47. 7. Best "All Around Survival" Rifle – "The Good Ole’" AR-15 Review In a nutshell: You knew this was coming: The AR’s light, rugged, accurate, proven, and popular. The AR-15 is not foldable and under normal circumstances, it won’t fit in a tiny little satchel like an AR-7. But it is the direct descendant of the U.S. Military’s most popular weapon platform, and today, it is the single-most popular firearm sold in America. Check out our six-part piece on why that’s the case (and how to build one). The AR-15 is one of the best survival rifles for a few reasons: It’s still compact, its reliability and ruggedness now rivals that of the stick-‘er-in-the-mud Kalashnikov, and the aftermarket’s plethora of parts – to include break-apart barrels and buttstocks – make the black rifle capable of being stowed and performing perhaps better than any other entrant on this list. Thanks to polymer receivers, skeletonized handguards and bolts, and high-strength pencil barrels, ultralight ARs can be had under 4 pounds for the relative cheap. Sure, it’ll cost you more than a $250 rimfire. But if you’re skipping all the usual breakdown .22’s and gunning for the AR-15, chances are you’re willing to spend two to three times the cost of a simple Ruger or Henry. That brings us back to one of the big selling points: We’re sizing up this rifle piecemeal because most owners build, not buy. The AR-15’s overly saturated parts market means you can grab a 28-oz. barrel for around $175. Pair it with a cheap but reliable mil-spec upper and lower and a solid parts kit for around $150 more. Grab a lightweight handguard for $50. Even if you splurge and spend $250 on that nifty folding buttstock, you’re just over $600. Stick with a “run of the mill” AR and you’ll still get about 1 MOA of accuracy at 100 yards and an easily stowable rifle (the standard setup still breaks apart at the upper and lower receiver) for under $500. Don’t like the government knowing what kit and gear you’ve got? Grab an 80% lower and you can put together your AR completely off the books. Many preppers and survivalists do. Ammo is affordable and available aplenty, and you can effectively take most game with shots out past 200 yards. Other interesting articles: Best Prism Scope for Your Survival Rifle: Top Picks S&W 15-22 vs Ruger 10/22: Survival Rifle Debate for 2020 Best First Aid Kit for Survival: Top 7 Picks Reviewed for 2020 Best Ferro Rod for Survival: My Top 3 Picks in 2020

Celestron Astromaster 114 Review for New Stargazers

Celestron Astromaster 114 Review for New Stargazers

What You Will Get Here Specifications at a glance Whom is this product ideal for? Key Features of Celestron 31042 AstroMaster 114 EQ Reflector Telescope Pros Cons Common Questions and Answers Our Findings How to use and maintain Celestron Astromaster 114 Reflector Telescope? Customers’ Feedbacks Specifications at a glance Type Newtonian Reflector Telescope Product Dimensions 12 x 17 x 33 inches Ideal for Beginner Stargazers Aperture 114mm (4.48") Focal Length 1000mm (39.37") Included Items Optical tube| Tripod | Accessory tray | 2 eyepieces | Battery Weight 17 pounds Mount Type CG-2 Equatorial Software Starry Night Basic Edition Tripod 1.25" steel tube legs Editor Rating : 4 out of 5 star Check Latest Price &; Reviews On Amazon As a stargazing enthusiast, I have always been keen to observe the rings of Saturn , the craters of the moon and other planets visible from the Earth. Then one day, my dream came true as I had a telescope in my hand, and it enabled me to get a clear and amazing view of the sky. If you are a beginner stargazer just like I was, this celestron astromaster 114 review is for you. This telescope can be the right choice if you are a newbie who has just begun gazing at the night sky to see some Celestial & Terrestrial magic. Celestron 31042 AstroMaster 114 EQ Reflector Telescope comes with Permanently mounted StarPointer finderscope that offers sharp, detailed views of the night sky. You may go for a high-end model if you want to see galaxies and nebulae. But, for the novice astronomy enthusiast, this one has the features to be considered a topnotch telescope. Continue reading to find out how much it really can offer. Whom is this product ideal for? This product is ideal for newbie stargazing enthusiasts who love to observe the night sky to enjoy stellar views. One can also use this for birdwatching and whale-watching if he/she wants. This isn’t ideal for advanced astronomy. You have to spend more on a telescope of a larger aperture model if you want to delve into the beauty of galaxies and nebulae. Key Features of Celestron 31042 AstroMaster 114 EQ Reflector Telescope The key features of a product help it perform well and gain popularity to the users. Go through the following section to know the key features of this telescope. 1. Slow Motion Controls This telescope has two slow-motion control knobs to make fine pointing adjustment for both Right Ascension and Declination axes which are also termed as RA and DEC. this couple of slow-motion control knobs assist the telescope in achieving more stability. 2. The Erect Image Diagonal Erect image optics have the ability to make this telescope ideal for astronomical and terrestrial uses. It provides with a more comfortable viewing position. The erect image diagonal produces correctly oriented images avoiding inverted or flipped views. 3. Two Eyepieces It comes with two eyepieces. The 20mm eyepiece will give a moderately wide field view with low magnification, and the 10mm eyepiece will produce comparatively narrower field views with higher magnification. 4. The AstroMaster Equatorial Mount The AstroMaster equatorial mount uses an effective mechanism to move in two directions based on the celestial coordinate system. It works on the basis of two axis RA and DEC. RA axis comes into play to move the telescope in the East/West direction. And, DEC does the same while moving it in the North/South direction. 5. The StarPointer Finderscope A StarPointer red-dot finderscope works as a sighting tool while aiming at the telescope at the desired target. It is a reflex sight that functions using a red LED to project a superimposed red dot on your target. Align the finderscope with the main optics of the telescope before using it. Pros Quick and easy to set up Pre-assembled tripod Quick release dovetail attachment Accurate tracking Clear and crisp images Free Starry Night astronomy software. Cons The red-dot finderscope feature isn’t satisfactory. Common Questions and Answers Question : Can I take photos using my DSL with this telescope? Answer : Yes, but you have to buy some add-on kits such as a T-adapter and a T-ring . Besides, the ISO and the shutter speed of your camera need to be adjusted manually. Question : How long does the tripod extend? Answer : The tripod extends to 1.40 meter or 4 feet approximately. Our Findings It has been a few couples of years I am into stargazing. But, I was searching for a budget telescope ideal for the beginners. This telescope has come up as a result of my quest for the perfect telescope for the novice stargazer. Keep reading to know what I have found. 1. Performance It took me almost one hour to put it together to look through the telescope. The tripod is fairly sturdy providing a stable position. The mount is good enough to make it movable around your house or in the outdoors. After the installation process, I put this celestron astromaster telescope to the test. I used the 20mm eyepiece to focus on the target at first. Once the object is centered, the 10mm eyepiece did magic to zoom in the plants closer for me. I had a very pleasant experience while delving into the realm of stargazing. I was able to see the moon in detail with the craters, Saturn with rings, Jupiter along with its moons, Mars, Venus, and some distant stars. This device performed really well to see planets, but not to see the galaxies. 2. Ease of use The use of a telescope is somewhat complex as it deals with many things simultaneously. you are going to watch planets and stars, so it calls for the required expertise to find and see them correctly. Before that, make sure that the assembly is done perfectly. This isn’t a simple monocular , so take the help of an expert if anytime seems confusing. 3. Price This telescope is a great telescope in terms of the price and performance. It is a big bang for the buck as it comes with excellent features at a comparatively low price. So, price-wise, I have found it as a great purchase. How to use and maintain Celestron Astromaster "114 Reflector Telescope" ? The toughest challenge of using a telescope lies in its assembly process. Once you have assembled it correctly, learn how to use and care for this telescope from the remaining part of this celestron astromaster 114 review. 1. How to use it? You have to use the telescope differently to see different objects. Watching the moon is the easiest. You will know the rest if you continue watching the stars. Let’s know how to watch the moon with this telescope. Ensure that the sky is clear and set up the telescope with 20mm eyepiece. Find the red dot by using the finderscope. Keep moving the telescope until the red dot is centered to the moon. Gently adjust the focus knobs to get a sharp and clear image. The clarity of the views depends on some sky conditions such as steadiness of the air, transparency of the air, sky brightness, etc. 2. How to maintain it? Your telescope may catch dust and/or moisture very often you should do the following things to ensure the device performs at its best. Remove the larger particles simply using a camel hair brush gently. You can use a photographer’s squeeze bulb to blow away the debris if any. Mix distilled water and of over-the-counter isopropyl in the same ratio to clean the optics. Apply the above-mentioned solution to an unscented tissue and gently rub it from the center of the lens (or mirror) to the outer portion in straight lines Keep it in a well-protected cool and dry place. Customers’ Feedbacks This telescope has earned an overall rating of 4.0 out of 5 stars according to more than 350 reviews. Most of the customers are happy with its performance while a few of them have complaints about the efficacy of the red dot finderscope. Our Final Thoughts This is a great telescope for the novice stargazers who want to see the beauty of a starry night. You may need an advanced telescope to watch the deep-sky objects such as the distant planets and the galaxies. We recommend using this telescope if you don’t want to spend more on your telescope. This telescope is a great inclusion in the leagues of the budget telescope. Hoe you will make an educated decision while making a purchase after reading this Celestron Astromaster 114 Review. Check "Latest Price &" ; Reviews On Amazon share share share share share

The Best Springfield XD Accessories For Your Pistol

Advertisment Springfield XD Accessories Recently, we did an article on what we think are some of the best 9mm handguns on the market. The round, even though it has been around for a long time, is easily one of, if not the, premier handgun cartridge. It is for that reason that we recommend it for concealed carry and also recommend the Springfield XD for your everyday carry as well. In looking to get a concealed carry 9mm handgun, one of the best on the market is the Springfield XD(M). For this one, we’re focusing on their competition model, which comes with a 5.25 inch barrel. That makes it a breeze to shoot, as it has a long sight radius. Additionally, there’s been weight taken out of a slide, and a rail is on the front in order for the mounting of accessories. While we don’t specifically mention a light here, as we try to make these lists tailored, you certainly could add one. This list is meant to help you get started in carry in the Springfield XD. On the list, we focus on a few things. First, we want to get you a good holster in which to actually carry the XD. Second, we think that the ergonomics can be modified just a little bit in order to fit the preferences of induvial a little bit better. Finally, the addition of some slightly upgraded sights, as well as a cleaning kit, can help make the Springfield XD one of the greats on the 9mm market today. Really, the ability of manufacturers such as Springfield to put out factory-tuned competition guns at relatively affordable prices makes our ability to defend ourselves with fantastic tools that much easier. Now is a great time to being to get involved in 9mm. The round has been around (I apologize for that pun) for nearly a century, and with guns like the XD, we full well expect the space force to end up doing moon raids with 9mm pistols much like this one in another century. Contents Springfield XD Accessories Crossbreed Deluxe Holster Promag 32 Round Magazine Hogue Grip Sleeve Talon Grips Trijicon Night Sights Springfield XD Subcompact OEM Magazine Aliengear Holster Crimson Trace Laser/Light Viridian Holster With Light/Laser Dead Air Armament Silencer Parting Shots…. Crossbreed Deluxe Holster When it comes to concealed carry, one of the first things that we think about is a holster. A good holster should retain the gun safely, help you draw quickly, and avoid accidentally exposing the firearm to anyone else. There are a variety of ways to accomplish this, and they’re all worth thinking about. One way to address your holster needs is with this great option by Crossbreed holsters . This is an inside the waistband holster with two really sturdy belt clips and a Kydex pocket for the Springfield XS-S. This simple to use, no nonsense holster will help lay the gun flat against your body, which aids in retention, comfort, and avoids printing. Additionally, the backing is made out of quality leather, so eventually it will mold to your body for a very comfortable fit. Promag 32 Round Magazine Of course, concealability is not always a concern. At certain times, it’s ammo capacity that’s on your mind. That’s why we recommend these 32 round stick magazines by Promag . To be fair, these would be a little bit impractical for concealed carry, as they stick out of the bottom of the gun a fair bit. They would, however, be really useful in two plausible scenarios. First, a longer magazine is a great thing to have in a competition . Reloads cost precious seconds, so the fewer of those that you have to do, the better you end up scoring. Second, many of us carry a bag of some sort on a daily basis. This would make an excellent secondary magazine for that kind of situation, where you’d reach for it after the magazine in the gun goes dry. It’s also a lot of fun to dump 32 rounds of 9mm in a single go, so we think these Promags certainly have their use. Hogue Grip Sleeve While we’re on the subject of ergonomics and concealability, it’s worth considering the overall grip as well. Again, we think that Springfield did a good job- they are on our top ten list after all. That said, polymer can get a little slick, especially in rainy, or worse, bloody conditions. You may want to do something that gives you a better chance of maintaining good hand position in a bad situation. If such a bad situation arises, you may want to have something like the Hogue HandAll Hybrid Grip sleeve . This is basically the high-speed version of what old special forces types used to do to remedy their A1 handles on M16s. They used inner tubes from bicycles. You can do better than that with this made to measure Hogue rubberized grip that is not only comfortable, but grippy as well. It also adds just a little bit of girth to the Springfield XD’s grip, if that something you need in order to make the gun more comfortable for you. Talon Grips If you tried out the Hogue grips and still aren’t satisfied with the level of texture, you might want to try something else out. Now, the DIYer in me suggests skateboard grip tape, hot glue, and a razor knife. But, I have been told by others, that might not be the best way to modify a competition style pistol that costs a fair chunk of change. So, what else can we do to get some more grip on the Springfield XD? Talon had about the same idea that I was working towards with the grip tape, only they sell it in a pre-cut fashion that will actually look good on the gun when it’s finished. This adhesive grip is cut around all of the controls for the Springfield XD and installs in seconds assuming you’re careful. It’s a great way to add a ton of texture to the gun without adding any real weight or bulk whatsoever. Trijicon Night Sights As a competition gun, the Springfield XD comes with pretty good sights right out of the box. There are, however, people looking to squeeze every once of performance that they possibly can out of their XD. To that end, sights a great start. One spot in which the sights on the XD might come up a little bit short is in terms of night fighting, which is a distinct possibility in the concealed carry realm. One solution would be to replace the stock sights with this Trijicon set made for the shield. Trijicon really needs no introduction. They’ve been in the optics game forever, and they make excellent stuff. With that in mind, these night sights retain the three dot setup, with a bit of an upgrade. That upgrade is the inclusion of tritium, which will keep these sights glowing brightly in the dark for many years to come. Additionally, you don’t loose much speed with these when compared to the stock sights. If you need to make fast shots, all you really have to do is follow the green dot and put it on the desired target. For accurate shooting, you can take your time and line up all tree dots. Springfield XD Subcompact OEM Magazine The model of Springfield XD that we mentioned specifically in the referenced article is the full-sized M model. But, it’s important to keep in mind that the XD is actually a pretty wide series of handguns in varying sizes and calibers. For this one, we wanted to show some love to one of the smaller parts f the series, the Mod 2 subcompact. The subcompact is an easily concealable model, so we expect some of our CCW friends to have picked one up by now. Of course, a gun needs magazines. These are the OEM magazines for the subcompact. They can fit 13 rounds of 9mm in a double stack. You don’t have to have the relatively large M model to appreciate that Springfield puts a lot of thought into the XD series and full well intends to give the Austrians a run for their market share. Aliengear Holster Returning for a moment to concealed carry and holsters, this Alien Gear shapeshifter is an awesome holster system. At its core, it’s a Kydex holster that comes on a paddle and can be adjusted to fit you the way you like it. But, that’s just the start. It also comes with a ton of other ways in which to attach the pistol to yourself, including extra paddles and some mounts. This system, for example, can be used to carry the pistol inside the waistband, but also mounted to a surface in your home or vehicle. It can also be converted for outside the waistband and is compatible with a lot of other Alien Gear products. Basically, this will get you started with their core system so that you can tinker with carrying the exact way you like. Alien Gear is one of the best known companies in the holster game and we see why: their products are really modular. Crimson Trace Laser/Light Thinking still about the concealed carry game, we do need to make sure that we make good hits on our intended targets. One way to help do that in an intense and stressful situation is to add a laser to your firearm. If you choose to do that, Crimson Trace is very hard to beat in terms of quality. This, the laser guard for the XDS combines a red laser and a bright white light in a small package that simply attaches to the trigger guard, making it easy to turn off and on without looking. Installation is easy,. And battery light is long. You can take some time and tinker with all the modes, and eventually take it to the range and zero the laser. Basically, this is a way of getting a fast and easy lighting and sight solution onto your XD with minimal tools that leaves you with a quality setup. Viridian Holster With Light/Laser Now, we do like simplicity. When a good kit comes along, it gives you the opportunity to make a single purchase and get a lot done. That’s the case here. With this kit, you get a quality tactical laser and light, as well as a holster that is compatible with that light on the Springfield XD. Aside from convenience, this saves you form having to look for a holster that fits with a certain light and pistol combo. Instead, this IWB holster fits perfectly with the Viridian light and laser combo. Dead Air Armament Silencer If you happen to have a threaded barrel on your XD, we have an idea. Put a suppressor on it! This one, by Dead Air , is one of the cooler ones on the market. Basically, the suppressor is meant so that you can take it apart at each baffle. This has two major advantages. First, you can take it apart and clean it yourself, saving you from having to transfer it to a local gun store or the manufacturer to have it serviced. Second, you can make it longer or shorter to make a compromise between size, weight, and suppression. If you wanted, there’s nothing stopping you form hand loading some really soft shooting rounds , running it super short, and making, effectively, a modern version of the Welrod pistol. Or you can run modern subsonic ammo and get great results out of the full-length suppressor. Either way, as long as you have a 1/2×28 threaded barrel, this will go right on and make your XD a great home defense or night fighting handgun. Parting Shots…. Looking at this list, you’ll notice that we don’t touch the internals of the XD whatsoever. That’s because we think that the folks at Springfield did a really good job and have made a reliable 9mm pistol that will serve you well at competitions or in self-defense situations. Whatever you use it for, we think that a few little touches, such as a grip and a new magazine, perhaps a set of sights, will have you well set in order to concealed carry one of the finest 9m pistols on the market today. With a good holster, some sighs, or perhaps a suppressor, you can make the Springfield XD one of the top performing handguns on the market today without doing any major modifications to the internals of the firearm whatsoever, so why not experiment a little?

USCCA Is It Worth The Money? [Review]

While the vast majority of us have car insurance, very few of us have CCW insurance. Yes, there actually is such a thing. Basically, should you ever need to use your firearm in self-defense and rack up hefty legal fees in the courtroom defending yourself, you can use your CCW insurance to cover the cost. Considering the fact that your legal fees could potentially amount to several hundred thousand dollars (as cases involving firearms are notoriously complex), having insurance to cover that should begin to sound appealing. Only around a quarter of American citizens have sufficient money set aside in an emergency fund, which means that most of us are even more underprepared for the legal cost of having to defend ourselves in court. There are a number of different insurance options that are available, and we’ll talk about the CCW insurance offered from USCCA (United States Concealed Carry Association) in this article. But first, let’s dive into what CCW insurance is exactly and when/how you will need to use it. @import url("//fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Open+Sans:400,700&subset=latin");@import url("//fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Lato:300,700,400&subset=latin");@media (min-width: 300px){[data-css="tve-u-45bd34974a1514"] { background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-05bd34974a141d"] { border: none; background-image: none !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; margin-top: 0px !important; padding: 0px !important; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-25bd34974a149a"] { background-image: none !important; background-color: rgb(242, 237, 237) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-95bd34974a1640"] { margin-top: -10px !important; background-image: none !important; padding-top: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 15px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { line-height: 1.1em !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { font-family: inherit !important; color: rgb(5, 5, 5) !important; font-size: 17px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { line-height: 1em !important; }[data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] strong { font-weight: 700; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { font-family: Lato; font-weight: 400; font-size: 25px !important; color: rgb(5, 5, 5) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-75bd34974a15c8"] { padding-top: 0px !important; background-image: none !important; padding-bottom: 5px !important; text-align: center; }[data-css="tve-u-115bd34974a16b9"] { padding: 0px 0px 20px !important; background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-35bd34974a14d8"] { max-width: 760px; min-height: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] { margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] > .tcb-flex-col { padding-left: 0px; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] { border: none; border-radius: 5px; overflow: hidden; padding: 20px !important; margin-bottom: 20px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-85bd34974a1604"] { width: 85px; float: none; margin: 0px auto !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-145bd34974a1775"] { color: rgb(255, 255, 255) !important; font-size: 16px !important; font-family: "Open Sans" !important; letter-spacing: 1px; font-weight: 400 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-135bd34974a173a"] { overflow: hidden; max-width: 330px; float: none; width: 100%; background-color: rgb(241, 89, 42) !important; border-radius: 5px !important; padding-top: 5px !important; padding-bottom: 5px !important; margin-left: auto !important; margin-right: auto !important; z-index: 3; position: relative; }[data-css="tve-u-145bd34974a1775"] strong { font-weight: 700 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] strong { font-weight: 700 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] .tve-page-section-in { display: block; }}@media (max-width: 767px){[data-css="tve-u-75bd34974a15c8"] { text-align: center; background-image: none !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { font-size: 22px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-05bd34974a141d"] { background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-25bd34974a149a"] { background-image: none !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { font-size: 28px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-95bd34974a1640"] { background-image: none !important; padding-top: 10px !important; padding-bottom: 10px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] { padding-top: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-45bd34974a1514"] { background-image: none !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] { padding-bottom: 20px !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; padding-left: 10px !important; padding-right: 10px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-115bd34974a16b9"] { padding: 10px 0px !important; background-image: none !important; }} .tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h1,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h2,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h3{margin:0;padding:0}.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element p,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h1,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h2,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h3{margin:0} Get Deals on Guns and Tactical Gear Join 70,000 Readers For Our Weekly Discounts ​ GET MY DISCOUNTS Table of Contents 1 What Exactly Is CCW Insurance? 2 When Will You Need To Use Your CCW Insurance? 3 What Does the USCCA CCW Insurance Have To Offer? 4 Is The USCCA Legitimate? 5 Is USCCA CCW Insurance Worth It? 6 Conclusion What Exactly Is CCW Insurance? CCW insurance, to put it simply, is insurance to financially cover the costs of any legal case involving you defending yourself with a gun . Even if you were completely justified in your actions, you’re going to be in a massive mess in the courtroom and your legal fees will begin to accrue exponentially. Your CCW insurance will be able to help cover the cost, including with: Bail Defense Lost Wages Yes, the chances of you ever actually using your CCW insurance are rather low. Nonetheless, the old but true adage goes that it’s always better to be safe than sorry. So while you will likely never need your CCW insurance, the very fact that you have it can give you peace of mind . And should you need it, it will be there to help out with your financially. In other words, should you need to use your CCW insurance, it can literally prevent you from falling into bankruptcy. When Will You Need To Use Your CCW Insurance? The moment after you use your firearm for defense, you must contact the authorities as soon as possible, if they haven’t arrived already. When they do arrive, place your hands where they can be clearly seen and lay your firearm down on the ground. Engage the safety on your firearm beforehand if it has a manual safety. Always obey what the police officers tell you to do . Even if you feel you were justified in the shooting and are innocent, the cops don’t know that (yet). As a result, they will be shouting orders loudly, act aggressive, and treat you as if you are a criminal. Remember, the cops are risking their lives by being on the scene. You will most likely be handcuffed and taken to the local jail. Do not answer any of their questions and remember you have a right to remain silent. Anything you say can later be used against you. Once you are allowed to make a phone call, call USCCA (their number should be on your card) and explain what happened. They will then post your bail and assign a lawyer to take your case. Should charges be pressed against you, you will go to court and the legal fees will really begin to accrue…and it’s when you’ll really be glad you had the insurance. What Does the USCCA CCW Insurance Have To Offer? USCCA is one of several CCW plans that are currently available. They currently offer three plans at the following prices: Gold ($600,000 protection) – $22/month Platinum ($,1,150,000 protection) – $30/month Elite ($2,250,000 protection) – $47/month There are many features and benefits that a USCCA CCW plan will provide you with. For one thing, your plan will cover the lawyer retainer fee from $2,500 up to $100,000, depending on the level of membership that you select . A major benefit to the USCCA is how it will cover your up front costs, which is something that many CCW plans won’t do as they reimburse you after the court battle. With USCCA, your fees are paid to you on an ongoing basis. USCCA will also provide you with a self-defense expert witness who can testify for you in court. The defense attorney they provide to you will also be an expert on self-defense laws both nationally and in your state. Another big advantage to USCCA is that it offers you firearms theft protection in addition to covering your legal fees. The firearm theft protection is currently set up to one million dollars depending on the level that you choose. Is The USCCA Legitimate? This is a major concern you may have, but the truth is yes, the USCCA is perfectly legitimate and on their website you will find an impressive collection of articles written by expert writers from all over the country. They also produce a magazine that serves as a rival to pretty much any other gun/ 2nd Amendment /CCW related magazine that’s out there. Their insurance is given out in the form of the Self Defense Shield , which is a very comprehensive self-defense shooting protection member benefit and insurance that can be used in all fifty states. Take note that the "Self Defense Shield" is NOT a law firm that is only limited to practice in your state. This is good news for you, because it means if you travel and have to use your firearm defensively in another state, USCCA will still protect you. Is USCCA CCW Insurance Worth It? It’s perfectly natural to be totally skeptical of CCW insurance. Not only is it not well known and can seem sketchy, you also may question if it’s worth it even if it is legitimate. First of all, the USCCA insurance is perfectly legitimate and one of the best CCW insurances on the market. So there’s no debate there. But the best case scenario is obviously that you’ll never have to use your CCW insurance, and this is the most likely scenario as well. As a result, is it really worth spending $22, $30, or $47 a month on insurance that you almost certainly will never ever need? Well, only you can decide that for yourself based on your own financial position, but take note that USCCA also offers far more than just the insurance. You’ll also get free training for customers, top quality magazines, and be eligible for weekly giveaways . Also ask yourself this: cost aside, if you do use your firearm defensively, do you want just any attorney the state provides for you or do you want an attorney who is an expert in self-defense laws ? In other words, do you want an expert to defend you in court or don’t you? If the answer is yes you do, then it’s only another reason to have USCCA insurance because you will be provided with an expert attorney. Combine that with the fact that most if not all of your legal costs would be covered, and it;’s easy to see how spending that $20 to $50 a month can be very much worth it. Conclusion In short, if you are a person who conceal carries in public, you need to be more than just prepared to defend yourself with your firearm. You also need to be prepared to defend yourself in the courthouse, and even if you are victorious and the shooting is ruled to be justifiable under law, it will be a very expensive endeavor. This is where having CCW insurance comes in. Not only will your costs be covered and you can avoid bankruptcy, you’ll also be given an expert attorney who will greatly increase your odds of winning your case. USCCA currently offers some of the best protection plans that are available, and if you agree that CCW insurance is something that would be nice to have even for just peace of mind, USCCA should be the first protection plan you consider. 3.5/5 (679 Reviews) Alex Joseph Alex Joseph is an avid bow hunter and father of two boys. Originally from Tacoma, Washington. Alex now resides in California. 6 COMMENTS Tw July 10, 2019 at 5:13 am Can you use your own attorney not theirs? Reply Michael September 1, 2019 at 2:54 pm @Tw Yes, just take a look at their website at usconcealedcarry.com Reply Bill September 14, 2019 at 4:54 pm I prefer Texas Law shield/ US Law Shield, better coverage for less. Reply Joseph Monteleone October 23, 2019 at 11:24 pm Does USCCA provide a team (boots on the ground) to the Members location to assure all needs are met? This includes a lawyer bail (if needed) and a support team? Reply Chris Browning October 24, 2019 at 11:01 am @ Joseph – I sent your question to their customer care team. Here was their response: “Upon notifying us of your self-defense, our Critical Response Team springs into action on your behalf. They will facilitate things like your bail/bond and the closest attorney in our Network to you. If you have an Attorney listed on your Membership, our "Critical Response Team" would reach out to them on your behalf. This Critical Response Team Member then become something similar to your Case Manager and will continue to facilitate your Member benefits through your self-defense incident, up to the limits of your level of Membership. Each case is different as to where representation will be needed.” Reply Tess July 17, 2020 at 12:13 pm That is why I chose CCW Safe. One of the BIGGEST DIFFERENCES between plans is DO THEY COVER COSTS & EXPENSES (C&E)? This is a HUGE amount of money that most people could not afford. — so DO read the Terms & Conditions before signing. Plans either Exclude C&E completely (meaning you pay all C&E out-of-pocket as you go along), or they may Include C&E in with attorney fees UP TO your max limit (which means you have less money for attorney fees), or they may Cover C&E apart from attorney fees which is the best of both worlds. Which you choose could make a HUGE difference in your immediate out-of-pocket expenses. Reply LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply

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The 4 Best Sights for Glock 22 – Night Sight Reviews 2020 Photo by Jeff Eaton / CC BY The Glock 22 . 40 pistol is one of the most popular Glock models. Issued by dozens of police departments from municipalities, to state to federal, the Glock 22 serves and has for decades.